Crochet, Temperature blanket

How to repair a crochet blanket

Hi guys! I hope you’re all keeping really well.

So, I promised quite a while ago, that I would do a blog post/tutorial, on how I repaired my temperature blanket… However, I procrastinated it; mainly because, I wasn’t sure that I would explain it well… Then I would be completely be at fault, if you followed my advice, and butchered your crochet blankets! However, the method is pretty simple, once you understand it. It works for all types of stitches, and doesn’t matter if it’s in rounds or rows; I just wasn’t able to find many tutorials, on how to do it in rows, and when you aren’t sure, it’s a little confusing.

Please feel free to message me, if anything doesn’t make sense; you think I’ve missed a stage out; or you just want a few tips, I will be happy to help, as best as I can. In an ideal world, I would have a camera, and I would record it for you all AND take decent photos (sorry) but maybe in the future, that could happen! Wishful thinking.

What you will need:

  • Your crochet blanket that needs repairing
  • A crochet hook in the required size
  • Tapestry needle (fully recommend a metal one, but plastic is fine)
  • Scissors
  • A long strand of yarn (make sure it’s slightly longer than the blanket in question)
  • A ball of yarn (in your colour choice

You will also need to have an understanding of how to crochet; what stitch is used; the yarn weight and the yarn fibres.FullSizeRender

 

Before you start, it’s completely up to you if you want to remove the whole row, or only part of it. I removed the whole row, so I could show you how to start from the beginning. If you’re a little nervous or confused about this process, you can make a sample piece to test on. It’s really about trial and error, the more you practice, the more it makes sense and easier it becomes. My biggest tip, is to remember to keep re-positioning your hook, to stop the yarn twisting on itself and making unnecessary knots.

Good luck!

*I’m doing this tutorial following the moss stitch, so just change parts to suit the stitch you’re working with*

1. Start off by saving your stitches; weave in through the centre of the loops.

In this case, the white row is being removed.

Make sure you don’t forget to pick the chain one stitch up on the end!

2. Once all the stitches are caught, snip the unwanted row. You can see that each stitch is essentially just two little loops. 

3. Attach the new strand of yarn, to the bottom piece. Even if you don’t like knots in your work, please don’t ignore me, tie it to your work, or else it’s more likely to come undone. Chain one.

 

4. Pull up a loop. With your hook, position it to the left side of the saved stitches, and pull through the yarn. Chain one.

5. Crochet your SC (UK terms) stitch, chain one. Repeat previous steps until the end of the row. When you reach the end, slip stitch into the last stitch, on the bottom half (pink) and then slip stitch into the last stitch, on the top half (yellow) tie off as normal. 

Good as new!

IMG_6505

IMG_6508
Front

 

IMG_6507
Reverse

If you look closely enough, you’ll be able to see I missed a few chain one spaces, oops!

 

Ok, so it won’t look EXACTLY like it would originally, but this is as close as you can possibly get. Instead of the stitch sitting in the chain space, it will sit into the chain stitch, which, makes it a little more loose/gappy, as you can see below. There’s nothing wrong with that, though.

Hopefully you have been able to follow the steps easily, let me know if not!

Thank you for reading

OJ

xo

 

 

 

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